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But because he could not automatically download all papers from the subscription databases, he cannot be sure that he has spotted every SCIgen-generated paper. But what about that for a press release? As a scientist, I'm naturally intrigued about the latter and how fake research and sometimes completely fake papers are published.

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Who would have thought to mine the scientific literature for random papers? The relevant conference proceedings were peer reviewed, she confirms — making it more mystifying that the papers were accepted. His detection technique, described in a study 1 published in Scientometrics ininvolves searching for characteristic vocabulary generated by SCIgen.

In his view, there is little evidence that open-access publishers — which charge fees to publish manuscripts — necessarily have less stringent peer review than subscription publishers.

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SciDetect is highly flexible and can be quickly customized to cope with new methods of automatically generating fake or random text. Those fake papers look astonishingly real with interesting headings, graphs and citations. If publishers take pride in their work they need to come up with other measures to ensure the quality of their publications like having a human read them. Springer uses the software in its production workflow to provide additional, fail-safe checking. They probably would feel bad and apologize to their readers. Academics are under intense pressure to publish, conferences and journals want to turn their papers into profits, and universities want them published. Springer has published 8 million papers and only found 18 to be fake.

It's the worst case scenario for an academic publishing company and required radical measures. Automatic detection of fake papers is not helpful, probably even counter-productive.

Biology paper generator

They published 18 articles consisting of random words under their name. In , mathematician Alan Sokal riled postmodernists by publishing a nonsense paper in the leading US journal, Social Text. With some effort I could write a completely fake story in my field of genomics to fool some editor and reviewers of some journal. There is no indication of constructive self-criticism, which reiterates their earlier position in an initial response to the scandal from February With SciDetect, Springer probably has made it easier to submit fake papers because they believe they can detect fake papers automatically. Both organisations have now taken steps to remove the papers. They put their names on one of the papers, sent it to a conference, and promptly had it accepted. But it seems Springer also take offense in the original point of SciGen which was to uncover huge quality problems in the academic publishing industry from their first press release of February : There will always be individuals who try to undermine existing processes in order to prove a point or to benefit personally. I remember when SciGen was first released. But from how the press release goes on, we see that was not the case at all: The software reports suspicious activity by relying on sensitivity thresholds that can be easily adjusted. A related program generates random physics manuscript titles on the satirical website arXiv vs.

It was laden with meaningless phrases but, as Sokal said, it sounded good to them. So what does Springer take pride in as a scientific publisher?

According to the final report of Springer the authors of the 18 fake papers indeed used it to increase their publication output.

Biology paper generator

Does he regret the beast he helped unleash, or is he proud that it is still exposing weaknesses in the world of science? It took only a handful of days. Of course, that's a highly unethical use of SciGen. They deserve lots of credit to uncover the problem in the first place. After intensive collaboration with Dr. Krohn, who has now founded a startup called Keybase. Really Springer? They put their names on one of the papers, sent it to a conference, and promptly had it accepted. In other words, you input some typical jargon of a field and the program produces text according to these rules. It was laden with meaningless phrases but, as Sokal said, it sounded good to them. In , mathematician Alan Sokal riled postmodernists by publishing a nonsense paper in the leading US journal, Social Text. In his view, there is little evidence that open-access publishers — which charge fees to publish manuscripts — necessarily have less stringent peer review than subscription publishers.
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Publishers withdraw more than gibberish papers : Nature News & Comment